Remembering Beethoven

Today is the anniversary of the death of Ludwig Van Beethoven. One of the most inspirational and brilliant composers who has ever graced this earth. Who’s legacy still remains to enrich our lives and lift our hearts.

Ludwig Van Beethoven died on the 26th of March 1827 at the age of just 56. 

Although this was 191 years ago and therefore not a nice rounded number since his demise, his importance is such that this does not diminish the fact that remembering him today is worth while.

He was born on the 17th of December 1770 in Bonn, the city that at the time was the capital of the electorate of Cologne and of course this city became the capital of West Germany during the time of Germany’s unfortunate, but thankfully temporary, split.

In around 1790/91 he moved to the City of Vienna, such a bastion of musical enlightenment which includes Mozart and Haydn (among others) in its repertoire of musical notables that called Vienna home. 

Beethoven’s musical genius gave us the fantastic and inspiring 5th Symphony where the repeated notes (Duh, duh, duh, Dum) recall the knocking of opportunity, that sound that supposedly knocks for all of us at one stage of our lives and we ignore it at our peril.

He gave us the Moonlight Sonata and the piece known as Fur Elise, which are both staple diets for the practising pianists even to this day. 

He also gave us one of my absolute favourite pieces of music. His 6th Symphony, affectionately named The Pastoral Symphony.

He also left us many interesting quotes, although probably not as many as are attributed to him on social media that latch on to any name of the past to aggrandize a notable witticism. 

He said “Music is a higher revelation than philosophy”.

I think it can certainly be claimed that music and philosophy go hand in hand in inspiring our soul and lifting our spirits.

He said “Music is the mediator between the spiritual and the sensual life.” 

What could be more true and appropriate?

He said “To play a wrong note is insignificant but to play without passion is inexcusable.”

This should apply just as much to life itself. We should grab the opportunity knocking and don’t stop to fear a wrong note, or mistake along the path, we should just enjoy life with a passion. No Life lead with a passion could ever be called a failure. 

Finally, on his deathbed, he apparently said “Plaudite, amici, comedia finita est.”

“Applaud, my friends, the comedy is over.”

Well, my friend, we have never stopped Applauding.

Bravo, Beethoven, Bravo!

 

Copyright: Kristian Fogarty 26/March/2018

 

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